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Kicking history into new heights

Junior George “JJ” Martinez becomes first male Farmerette

Maritza Quintero

Maritza Quintero

Junior George "JJ" Martinez sits with the rest of the Diamonds as the coach instructs them about the routine.

Jayden Warren and Alonzo Lepper, Lewisville High School

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A yawn escapes his lips and his hands follow the motion he knows so well. Pens, pencils, ribbons and paints: it’s a run of the mill purchase that takes place at a cash register inside the Michael’s craft store off of Stemmons Freeway every day. A 5-foot-6 Hispanic boy stands behind the counter in the store that supplies one of his many art addictions. Colors, shapes and dance moves flood his mind while he quietly scans the various items. The rhythm follows him throughout his chores and something as simple as mopping the floor becomes a fully choreographed routine. Despite this mundane appearance, junior George “JJ” Martinez is paving the way for young boys aspiring to be a part of a female dominated school tradition.

“Before [dance] I hadn’t done anything for the school and suddenly I’m doing this big thing,” Martinez said. “Not trying to toot my own horn, [but] now I’m the next big thing and it makes me feel really good doing something for the school and I love doing it.”

At the beginning of his sophomore year, Martinez was accidentally put into child development but after realizing he didn’t want to be there he enrolled in dance one. While in the dance one course he quickly adapted to the setting and formed relationships with girls who hoped to become Farmerettes. They encouraged him to audition for the team alongside them when tryouts came along.

After many hours filled with stretching and late night practices, Martinez earned a spot on the Diamonds junior varsity dance team for the 2016-2017 school year. This was a feat on its own, but it wouldn’t stop there.

As a young kid, Martinez was introduced to the basic principles of art; which grew into a passion that would stick with him throughout his high school career.

“I was really into crafts as a kid,” Martinez said. “It was mostly from my grandma because when everyone was at work or school, I would be with my grandma and [we would] make little crafts. ”

Martinez has taken an art class every school year. In elementary school art was required, but once middle school hit he decided to continue taking art classes. That decision carried over to high school and Martinez hopes to eventually take AP art which is the final art course available.

Art is now his passion and he plans to pursue it after high school, even though the specific details have not been figured out yet.

“I just deeply love art, and it’s my favorite thing to do…really the only thing I can imagine myself doing [is] just the arts,” Martinez said. “I hate any academics pretty much, I can only see myself doing art in the future.”

So when the opportunity to express his love for art arose in a new form he jumped at the chance. After swiftly taking up dance one, he started becoming in tune with the new outlet.

His feet began to learn the steps and his arms followed the movements until they became a habit. From there they started to take on a life of their own, showcasing Martinez’s talent for art.

“[Dance] is an art form,” Martinez said. “How [you] make your body move is just like how you use a paintbrush, it’s just technique and how you express yourself.”

Gradually his skills transformed themselves from robotic to fluid movements and he found himself progressing and taking part in unfamiliar territory for his gender.

“I have only been dancing for a year and half and I didn’t have any [dance moves] down,” Martinez said. “I looked like I was like paralyzed or something. But my dance director, Ms. Sheeran, told me to be stretching at home a lot. People realized I was putting in twice the work stretching at home, and I felt accomplished.”

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